Pet Sematary Horror Movie, Pop-Art Original Framed Fine Art Painting, Image on Canvas, Artwork, Cult Movie Poster, Halloween

 99,00

Original framed poster artwork made using mixed media: high quality digital printing +acrylic painting + gloss finish on wood frame.

Main features:

  • Original digital artwork, inspired by classic comics
  • Handmade in Italy!
  • Every copy is unique, in limited edition and numbered on the back.
  • Hand signed by the artist
  • Unique Pop-Art style
  • Gloss Finish
  • Material Surface

Measures:

Painting size is 35×50 cm (about 14×20 inches).
Weight is about 500 grams.

Availability:

Artwork is handmade on request: It takes 1-3 days to be completed + shipping time.

Customization:

Artwork can be customized in colurs or subject. Our artworks are great also for a gift! You can even include a message on the back. Contact us for more informations about this feature!

Original Artwork Handmade in Italy by Arthole.it

 

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Description

Pet Sematary is a 1983 horror novel by American writer Stephen King. The novel was nominated for a World Fantasy Award for Best Novel in 1986, and adapted into two films: one in 1989 and another in 2019.

The first film adaptation, Pet Sematary, was released in 1989. Directed by Mary Lambert, it starred Dale Midkiff as Louis, Fred Gwynne as Jud, Denise Crosby as Rachel, Brad Greenquist as Victor, Miko Hughes as Gage, and Blaze Berdahl as Ellie. King wrote the screenplay and had a cameo as a minister. The film received mixed reviews, but it was a commercial success. A sequel, Pet Sematary Two, was released in 1992.

A second film adaptation of the novel was released on April 5, 2019. Directed by Dennis Widmyer and Kevin Kölsch, the film stars Jason Clarke as Louis Creed, Amy Seimetz as Rachel Creed, John Lithgow as Jud Crandall, Jeté Laurence as Ellie Creed, and twins Hugo and Lucas Lavoie as Gage Creed. The film grossed over $113 million worldwide and received mixed reviews from critics, who praised the dark tone, atmosphere and performances, but disliked the slow pacing and reliance on jump scares. Critics and audiences were both divided on the changes between the film and book, though many named it better than the 1989 adaptation.