Mark Renton (Ewan McGregor) from Trainspotting Movie, Pop-Art Original Fine Art Print on Recycled Paper, Artwork, Cult Movie

 49,99

Limited edition original Pop-Art printed on 100% recycled paper.

Original Artwork by GreenPopArt, an Arthole Project.

Art Print size is DIN A3 Format
(29,7 x 42 cm / 11,7 x 16,5 inches)

Main Features:

  • Unique Pop-Art Style
  • Eco-Friendly and Sustainable Art
  • Original Designs, available only on GreenPopart.com
  • Vintage 220gr. recycled light brown paper, with retrò effect
  • Only 25 copies available
  • Hand signed, numbered and dry embossed
  • Comes with white 350gr. passe-partout for framing

Why is this Pop-Art different?
Because it’s our declaration of love for the Planet. These original artworks are printed on 100% recycled paper, guaranteed by FSC. No tree has been cut down to make your home wall more beautiful.

No waste was done while creating this fine art print.
Cardboards, packaging and envelopes are all eco-sustainable. We also chose vegan, not animal-tested, water-based stamp inks and glues.

Original Artwork Handmade in Italy by Arthole.it

 

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Description

Trainspotting is a 1996 British black comedy-drama film directed by Danny Boyle and starring Ewan McGregor,Ewen Bremner, Jonny Lee Miller, Kevin McKidd, Robert Carlyle, and Kelly Macdonald in her debut. Based on the 1993 novel of the same title by Irvine Welsh, the film was released in the United Kingdom on 23 February 1996.

The Academy Award-nominated screenplay by John Hodge follows a group of heroin addicts in an economically depressed area of Edinburgh and their passage through life. Beyond drug addiction, other themes in the film include an exploration of the urban poverty and squalor in Edinburgh.
Trainspotting was released to critical acclaim, and is regarded by many critics as one of the best films of the 1990s. The film was ranked tenth by the British Film Institute (BFI) in its list of Top 100 British films of the 20th century. In 2004, the film was voted the best Scottish film of all time in a general public poll. In 2017 a poll of 150 actors, directors, writers, producers and critics for Time Out magazine ranked it the tenth best British film ever.