King Leonidas from 300 movie, Pop-Art Original Framed Fine Art Painting, Image on Canvas, Artwork, Cult Movie Poster, Sparta

 99,00

Original framed poster artwork made using mixed media: high quality digital printing +acrylic painting + gloss finish on wood frame.

Main features:

  • Original digital artwork, inspired by classic comics
  • Handmade in Italy!
  • Every copy is unique, in limited edition and numbered on the back.
  • Hand signed by the artist
  • Unique Pop-Art style
  • Gloss Finish
  • Material Surface

Measures:

Painting size is 35×50 cm (about 14×20 inches).
Weight is about 500 grams.

Availability:

Artwork is handmade on request: It takes 1-3 days to be completed + shipping time.

Customization:

Artwork can be customized in colurs or subject. Our artworks are great also for a gift! You can even include a message on the back. Contact us for more informations about this feature!

Original Artwork Handmade in Italy by Arthole.it

 

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Description

300 is a 2006 American epic historical action film based on the 1998 comic series of the same name by Frank Miller. Both are fictionalized retellings of the Battle of Thermopylae in the Persian Wars. The film was co-written and directed by Zack Snyder, while Miller served as executive producer and consultant. It was filmed mostly with a superimposition chroma key technique to replicate the imagery of the original comic book.

The plot revolves around King Leonidas (Gerard Butler), who leads 300 Spartans into battle against the Persian “God-King” Xerxes (Rodrigo Santoro) and his invading army of more than 300,000 soldiers. As the battle rages, Queen Gorgo (Lena Headey) attempts to rally support in Sparta for her husband.

300 premiered on December 9, 2006, and was released at the Berlin International Film Festival on February 14, 2007. The film received mixed reviews, with critics praising its visuals and style but criticizing its depiction of the Persians. Grossing over $456 million, the film’s opening was the 24th-largest in box office history at the time.