JAWS Cult Movie by Steven Spielberg, Pop-Art Original Framed Fine Art Painting, Image on Canvas, Artwork, Horror, 70s

 99,00

Original framed poster artwork made using mixed media: high quality digital printing +acrylic painting + gloss finish on wood frame.

Main features:

  • Original digital artwork, inspired by classic comics
  • Handmade in Italy!
  • Every copy is unique, in limited edition and numbered on the back.
  • Hand signed by the artist
  • Unique Pop-Art style
  • Gloss Finish
  • Material Surface

Measures:

Painting size is 35×50 cm (about 14×20 inches).
Weight is about 500 grams.

Availability:

Artwork is handmade on request: It takes 1-3 days to be completed + shipping time.

Customization:

Artwork can be customized in colurs or subject. Our artworks are great also for a gift! You can even include a message on the back. Contact us for more informations about this feature!

Original Artwork Handmade in Italy by Arthole.it

 

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Description

Jaws is a 1975 American thriller film directed by Steven Spielberg, based on a 1974 novel by Peter Benchley. In the film, a man-eating great white shark attacks beachgoers at a summer resort town, prompting police chief Martin Brody (Roy Scheider) to hunt it with the help of a marine biologist (Richard Dreyfuss) and a professional shark hunter (Robert Shaw).

Shot mostly on location on Martha’s Vineyard in Massachusetts, Jaws was the first major motion picture to be shot on the ocean, and consequently had a troubled production, going over budget and past schedule. As the art department’s mechanical sharks often malfunctioned, Spielberg decided mostly to suggest the shark’s presence, employing an ominous and minimalist theme created by composer John Williams to indicate its impending appearances. Spielberg and others have compared this suggestive approach to that of director Alfred Hitchcock.

Jaws was the prototypical summer blockbuster, regarded as a watershed moment in motion picture history, and it won several awards for its music and editing. It was the highest-grossing film until the release of Star Wars in 1977. Both films were pivotal in establishing the modern Hollywood business model, which pursues high box-office returns from action and adventure films with simple high-concept premises, released during the summer in thousands of theaters and advertised heavily. In 2001, it was selected by the Library of Congress for preservation in the United States National Film Registry as “culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant”.