JAWS Cult Movie by Steven Spielberg, Pop-Art Original Fine Art Print on Recycled Paper, Artwork, Movie Poster, Horror, 70s

 29,99

Limited edition original Pop-Art printed on 100% recycled paper.

Original Artwork by GreenPopArt, an Arthole Project.

Art Print size is DIN A3 Format
(29,7 x 42 cm / 11,7 x 16,5 inches)

Main Features:

  • Unique Pop-Art Style
  • Eco-Friendly and Sustainable Art
  • Original Designs, available only on GreenPopart.com
  • Vintage 220gr. recycled light brown paper, with retrò effect
  • Only 25 copies available
  • Hand signed, numbered and dry embossed
  • Comes with white 350gr. passe-partout for framing

Why is this Pop-Art different?
Because it’s our declaration of love for the Planet. These original artworks are printed on 100% recycled paper, guaranteed by FSC. No tree has been cut down to make your home wall more beautiful.

No waste was done while creating this fine art print.
Cardboards, packaging and envelopes are all eco-sustainable. We also chose vegan, not animal-tested, water-based stamp inks and glues.

Original Artwork Handmade in Italy by Arthole.it

 

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Description

Jaws is a 1975 American thriller film directed by Steven Spielberg, based on a 1974 novel by Peter Benchley. In the film, a man-eating great white shark attacks beachgoers at a summer resort town, prompting police chief Martin Brody (Roy Scheider) to hunt it with the help of a marine biologist (Richard Dreyfuss) and a professional shark hunter (Robert Shaw).

Shot mostly on location on Martha’s Vineyard in Massachusetts, Jaws was the first major motion picture to be shot on the ocean, and consequently had a troubled production, going over budget and past schedule. As the art department’s mechanical sharks often malfunctioned, Spielberg decided mostly to suggest the shark’s presence, employing an ominous and minimalist theme created by composer John Williams to indicate its impending appearances. Spielberg and others have compared this suggestive approach to that of director Alfred Hitchcock.

Jaws was the prototypical summer blockbuster, regarded as a watershed moment in motion picture history, and it won several awards for its music and editing. It was the highest-grossing film until the release of Star Wars in 1977. Both films were pivotal in establishing the modern Hollywood business model, which pursues high box-office returns from action and adventure films with simple high-concept premises, released during the summer in thousands of theaters and advertised heavily. In 2001, it was selected by the Library of Congress for preservation in the United States National Film Registry as “culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant”.