David Lo Pan, Big Trouble in Little China Movie, Pop-Art Original Fine Art Print on Recycled Paper, Artwork, Cult Movie Poster, Fantasy

 29,99

Limited edition original Pop-Art printed on 100% recycled paper.

Original Artwork by GreenPopArt, an Arthole Project.

Art Print size is DIN A3 Format
(29,7 x 42 cm / 11,7 x 16,5 inches)

Main Features:

  • Unique Pop-Art Style
  • Eco-Friendly and Sustainable Art
  • Original Designs, available only on GreenPopart.com
  • Vintage 220gr. recycled light brown paper, with retrò effect
  • Only 25 copies available
  • Hand signed, numbered and dry embossed
  • Comes with white 350gr. passe-partout for framing

Why is this Pop-Art different?
Because it’s our declaration of love for the Planet. These original artworks are printed on 100% recycled paper, guaranteed by FSC. No tree has been cut down to make your home wall more beautiful.

No waste was done while creating this fine art print.
Cardboards, packaging and envelopes are all eco-sustainable. We also chose vegan, not animal-tested, water-based stamp inks and glues.

Original Artwork Handmade in Italy by Arthole.it

 

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Description

Big Trouble in Little China is a 1986 American fantasy martial arts action-comedy film directed by John Carpenter and starring Kurt Russell, Kim Cattrall, Dennis Dun and James Hong. The project fulfilled Carpenter’s long-standing desire to make a martial arts film.

The film tells the story of Jack Burton, who helps his friend Wang Chi rescue Wang’s green-eyed fiancée from bandits in San Francisco’s Chinatown. They go into the mysterious underworld beneath Chinatown, where they face an ancient sorcerer named David Lo Pan, who requires a woman with green eyes to marry him in order to release him from a centuries-old curse.

The film was a commercial failure, grossing $11.1 million in North America, below its estimated $19 to $25 million budget. It received mixed reviews that left Carpenter disillusioned with Hollywood and influenced his decision to return to independent filmmaking. It has since become an absolute cult classic and has a 74% average rating on Rotten Tomatoes and a steady audience on home video.